Nov 28, 2020  
2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Department of English


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Luis A. Iglesias, Chair
118 College Drive, Box 5037
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001
601.266.4319

L. Allen, C. Bailey, A. Ball, J. Barron, M. Barthelme, S. Barthelme, E. Boade, C. Carey, K. Cochran, R. M. Frank, D. Franke, C. Garland, M. Gehlawat, K. Harris, L. Iglesias,
J. Inman, S. Johnson, N. Jordan, S. Kinkopf, J. Lares, A. Milward, R. Powell, M. Ryan, M. Sciolino, K. Sellers, E. Stanback, C. Sumner, E. Tribunella, A. Valint, W. Watson, E. Weinauer

The Department of English prepares undergraduate majors for careers in teaching, law, business and other fields that require communication skills. The department offers a Bachelor of Arts with or without secondary teaching licensure. In addition to programs in English education and literature, the department sponsors a concentration in creative or professional writing.

The English major is designed to cultivate both historical understanding and critical skills. In addition to the basic set of requirements, English majors can choose from a varied selection of electives and specialized options. For English minors and non-majors, our program provides all kinds of opportunities to explore the worlds of literature and culture. By design, the BA in English provides students with a comprehensive array of courses rooted in the conviction that the study of literature is committed to the development of reading, writing and thinking skills - all of which are necessary beyond disciplinary study and a requirement sought by employers in all professions.

The English major curriculum focuses on providing students with the necessary tools needed to develop their critical engagement with texts and their exploration of the dynamic field of English studies, covering a wide gamut of historical periods, geographical zones, and critical approaches. To this end, the course of study follows a coherent, yet flexible, sequence that begins with an intense survey of the critical approaches and questions germane to the study of literature in English. From there, the major requires students to take all four survey courses (American Literature I & II and British Literature I & II), which provide a broad but comprehensive outline of the major works, authors, and literary movements that constitute literary history. Our survey courses also introduce students, through the courses' organization, to both the traditional and newer canons of the discipline. In addition, students are also required to take a course that exposes them to works by racially and ethnically diverse writers, thereby fully engaging their appreciation and understanding of the variety of voices and concerns found in Anglophone literary production.

Moving beyond the required sequence of courses, the student is allowed to explore the discipline and its array of period, subject, and generic topics - pursuing self-defined tracks that can be configured narrowly toward a specialization or comprehensively toward a generalist orientation. Either way, the curriculum is designed to fully engage students in their exploration of literature in English as a discipline while continually reinforcing the discipline's core values of critical thinking and effective communcation skills.

Requirements for a Major in English

Students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree in English must take the following:

  1. ENG 340 - Analysis of Literature : It is strongly recommended that this course be taken before any 400-level courses A minimum grade of C is required in this course. (3 hours).
  2. Four survey courses in British (ENG 350 , ENG 351 ) and American (ENG 370 , ENG 371 ) literature (12 hours)
  3. One course in ethnic literature, chosen from ENG 312 , ENG 313 , ENG 372 , ENG 410 , ENG 411 ENG 412  or ENG 473  (3 hours)
  4. The ENG 400 - Senior Seminar  must be taken in the final semester of course work. A minimum grade of C is required in this course (3 hours).
  5. Fifteen hours of English electives, at least nine of which must be at the 400-level, so that total hours in English equal 36

Requirements for a Major in English with an Emphasis in Teacher Licensure

Students seeking teacher licensure must take the following, earning a grade of C or higher in all English courses and in all required professional education courses:

  1. ENG 340 - Analysis of Literature : It is strongly recommended that this course be taken before any 400-level courses (3 hours).
  2. Four survey courses in British (ENG 350 , ENG 351 ) and American (ENG 370 , ENG 371 ) literature (12 hours)
  3. One course in ethnic literature, chosen from ENG 312 , ENG 313 , ENG 372 , ENG 410 , ENG 411 ENG 412  or ENG 473  (3 hours)
  4. ENG 400 - Senior Seminar  (3 hours), taken the semester prior to ENG 494  and ENG 495  
  5. Fifteen hours of English electives, at least three hours of which must be in language study and three hours in writing, with nine of the total hours at the 400-level

Students pursuing a degree in English with licensure must take the following English methods courses: ENG 401 , ENG 402 , ENG 403 , as well as the ENG 491 - Secondary English Practicum . During the final semester, the student completes practice teaching in English, ENG 494  and ENG 495 .

In addition, required teacher education courses include the following 12 hours: CIS 302 , CIS 313 , REF 469  and SPE 400 . Students must consult an adviser in the Department of English and the current Bulletin for prerequisites and proper sequences of courses.

Students who complete the licensure program are eligible for a license through an CAEP-approved program.

The Center for Writers

The Center for Writers, functioning under the aegis of the Department of English, offers undergraduates the opportunity to concentrate in poetry or fiction within the context of the basic English Bachelor of Arts degree. A cohesive sequence of workshop courses of increasing difficulty encourages student writers to locate and focus their talents and to observe and participate in the process of creative writing. A companion group of theory and literature courses places emphasis on contemporary and current writings, literary theory, and criticism in English and in translation. The Center sponsors two publications: Mississippi Review, a national journal of fiction, poetry and criticism; and Product, a student publication geared to publish and circulate within the university community the very best student writing.

The Writing Center

Cook Library, Room 112
601.266.4821

The Writing Center offers free tutorial assistance to Southern Miss students, faculty, and staff involved in writing projects. Tutors, who are faculty and graduate students trained in composition, work one-on-one with writers in a comfortable environment designed for both writing and talking about writing. Support is available in all areas of writing, ranging from topic exploration to development to preparation of final copy. Services are available on a drop-in or appointment basis, and writers may choose to visit once or to establish a long-term program of development. Instructors may also refer students to the Writing Center.

Programs

    Bachelor of ArtsOther Programs

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